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Portraits in Camp

7th New York State Militia at Camp Cameron, Washington, D.C., 1861. Attributed to Mathew B. Brady.

“Camp Cameron, named in honor of the Secretary of War, was situated on Meridian Hill, about two miles from the Capitol and one mile due north from Willard’s Hotel, on the Harper’s Ferry road. It contained about forty acres, and within its limited was the elegant old mansion of Dr. Stone, built by Madison in the first years of the century, and a favorite summer residence of many of the Presidents.”—From the History of the Seventh Regiment of New York, 1806-1889, by Col. Emmons Clark.
“Camp Cameron, named in honor of the Secretary of War, was situated on Meridian Hill, about two miles from the Capitol and one mile due north from Willard’s Hotel, on the Harper’s Ferry road. It contained about forty acres, and within its limited was the elegant old mansion of Dr. Stone, built by Madison in the first years of the century, and a favorite summer residence of many of the Presidents.”—From the History of the Seventh Regiment of New York, 1806-1889, by Col. Emmons Clark.
“Situated upon an elevated terrace, Camp Cameron commanded a view of the city of Washington, with its broad avenues and elegant public buildings; of the Potomac, stretching away like a beautiful lake to Alexandria, and of the famous Heights of Arlington, in Virginia. In front of the camp was a large parade-ground, which afforded ample room for the evolutions of the battalion. The Stone mansion was occupied by Colonel [Marshall] Lefferts and his staff, and the out-buildings were a convenient depot for commissary stores.” —From the History of the Seventh Regiment.
“Situated upon an elevated terrace, Camp Cameron commanded a view of the city of Washington, with its broad avenues and elegant public buildings; of the Potomac, stretching away like a beautiful lake to Alexandria, and of the famous Heights of Arlington, in Virginia. In front of the camp was a large parade-ground, which afforded ample room for the evolutions of the battalion. The Stone mansion was occupied by Colonel [Marshall] Lefferts and his staff, and the out-buildings were a convenient depot for commissary stores.” —From the History of the Seventh Regiment.
“Magnificent old oaks, veterans of the ancient forest, flourished on every side, and lent to the landscape wonderful beauty. As the Seventh Regiment was the first to seek a camping-ground, it is not strange that this, the. Most lovely locality in all that region, was selected; and it is a historical fact, well worthy of record and remembrance, that the Seventh Regiment was the first regiment in all the country to pitch its tents in front of the enemy during the great rebellion.” —From the History of the Seventh Regiment.
“Magnificent old oaks, veterans of the ancient forest, flourished on every side, and lent to the landscape wonderful beauty. As the Seventh Regiment was the first to seek a camping-ground, it is not strange that this, the. Most lovely locality in all that region, was selected; and it is a historical fact, well worthy of record and remembrance, that the Seventh Regiment was the first regiment in all the country to pitch its tents in front of the enemy during the great rebellion.” —From the History of the Seventh Regiment.

22nd New York State Militia near Harpers Ferry, Va., 1862. Attributed to  Mathew B. Brady.

Commissary Sgt. John C. Thompson leans against the post of a tent filled with wood boxes and measuring cups. Originally a private in Company A, he was appointed commissary in July 1862.

Commissary Sgt. John C. Thompson leans against the post of a tent filled with wood boxes and measuring cups. Originally a private in Company A, he was appointed commissary in July 1862.
Pvt. George Sheppard of Company G knelt before his open backpack in front of a tent and below the Stars and Stripes. A stack of letters wrapped by ribbon is visible on top of the pack. He served on duty in Harpers Ferry for three months in 1862, and in Pennsylvania for a 30-day stint in 1863.

Pvt. George Sheppard of Company G knelt before his open backpack in front of a tent and below the Stars and Stripes. A stack of letters wrapped by ribbon is visible on top of the pack. He served on duty in Harpers Ferry for three months in 1862, and in Pennsylvania for a 30-day stint in 1863.
Sgt. Frederick Sturges, center, was a founding member of Company G. Like most soldiers in the regiment, he served in 1862 and 1863. During the later duty in Pennsylvania, he participated in the Battle of Carlisle on July 1. According to one report, he and a comrade were on the way to the home of some young ladies with whom they had been flirting when Confederate troops began to shell the town.

Sgt. Frederick Sturges, center, was a founding member of Company G. Like most soldiers in the regiment, he served in 1862 and 1863. During the later duty in Pennsylvania, he participated in the Battle of Carlisle on July 1. According to one report, he and a comrade were on the way to the home of some young ladies with whom they had been flirting when Confederate troops began to shell the town.
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